psoriasis and obesity link

Obesity is an important risk factor for psoriasis

There are many reasons why we may experience obesity – some are within and some beyond our control, and somewhere in between. Very much like our control of psoriasis in some ways.

A concept occurred to me a long time ago about form and texture.  I decided that if my texture isn’t as good as it should be, then I’ll put effort into my form instead. Fortunately, common sense finally convinced me to abandon body image pressures and focussed on controlling both weight as well as skin, and this study backs up the reason why.

The relationship between psoriasis and obesity is two-directional – obesity can predispose you to psoriasis and psoriasis favours obesity. Both psoriasis and obesity are considered a chronic, low-grade inflammatory condition.

I’d like to introduce you to a tissue, a hormone and a condition.

The adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ. It secretes peptide hormones including leptin.

Leptin hormone regulates appetite and body weight. Leptin also plays important roles in the chronic pro-inflammatory state associated with visceral obesity and metabolic syndrome.

Studies in psoriasis have shown that psoriasis patients have higher leptin levels compared with healthy tested patients.

Psoriasis is an independent risk factor for hyperleptinemia, a condition where excess levels of leptin in the blood increases body fat content and stimulates appetite.

What was first – psoriasis or obesity?

Patients with psoriasis have a slightly increased risk for developing obesity. However, because stresses to the body bring on psoriasis, there is a possibility that obesity can bring on or increase the severity of psoriasis.

The link between obesity and psoriasis could be explained by the fact that low-grade systemic inflammation exists in both conditions. In theory, mechanisms that increase inflammation brought on by obesity may also exacerbate psoriasis in overweight patients. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that weight loss and subsequent reduction of obesity-derived proinflammatory mechanisms in overweight patients with psoriasis will likely improve their condition.

Fact 1 – there is a two-fold increased risk for developing psoriasis in an obese condition as compared with normal weight people.

Fact 2 – Patients with a higher body mass index (BMI) have an increased risk for new-onset psoriasis, and the higher the BMI, the greater the psoriasis severity. For each unit increment increase in BMI there is reportedly a 9% higher risk for psoriasis onset and a 7% higher risk for increased psoriasis severity.

Fact 3 – Dermatologists now recognise that patients with psoriasis have an associated increased risk for hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, and vascular disease.

Most of us with psoriasis experience low morale from time to time because of the condition of our skin. According the World Health Organization’s Global Report on Psoriasis 2016, psoriasis is not only a disease that causes painful, debilitating, highly visible physical symptoms. It causes embarrassment, lack of self-esteem, anxiety and increased prevalence of depression.

Our greatest defence in keeping our spirits up is to nurture our body with the best possible nutrition to help reduce and remove our psoriasis. In most of our cases, I am delighted to say that we can take control ourselves. Psoriasis Life Mag proudly researches and presents specific targeted psoriasis dietary solutions. The onset or severity of obesity will naturally be managed by default, when these healthy nutrition guidelines are followed.

Wishing you a wonderful form and texture in the near future!

psoriasis health and psoriasis mindset

Disclaimer
References

Barrea L, Nappi F, Di Somma C, Savanelli MC, Falco A, Balato A, Balato N and Savastano S. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. Environmental Risk Factors in Psoriasis: The Point of View of the Nutritionist. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016;13, 2-4

Jensen,P; Zachariae,C; Christensen,R;.Geiker,N; Schaadt,B; Stender,S;Hansen,P; Astrup,A; Skov,L. JAMA Dermatol.2013;149(7):795-801

WHO. Global Report on Psoriasis. 2016;16

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